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Author Topic: turkey leftovers  (Read 4048 times)

milla

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turkey leftovers
« on: December 27, 2010, 07:36:22 AM »
This happens every year: I cook a huge turkey, then  we spend a fortnight eating turkey in many different guises. But just how many different recipes are there for leftover turkey? I make soup, curry, used to make pie but not anymore because of the pastry, still make turkey pasta… The BBC recipes website is quite good, but it’s getting boring.
Now here’s a challenge for all of you who love cooking and eating:
Let’s create a ‘fusion’ recipe for leftover turkey-the TTB turkey special!
We must not let our veggie friends out of it though, so how about a recipe to use leftover veg. and cranberry sauce??

Kelly

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #1 on: December 27, 2010, 11:00:29 AM »
My alltime favorite leftover meal for turkey is sammiches. On thick slices of artisan white bread, add a dab of your favorite mayo, then smear on a generous layer of warm stuffing, add cranberry sauce, top with turkey slices and enjoy.

Other family favorites:

Turkey Tetraznini
Turkey croquettes (my personal fav!)
Turkey pot pie
Hot turkey sandwiches (open face with gravy)
The requisite turkey soup (made from the carcass, which should provide adequate meat). At the end of cook time, you could slip in all those lovely veggies. The root veggies will thicken the broth.

You could serve extra cranberry sauce with all manner of meats that you cook this week, including salmon, chicken, pork sausages, beef. Pretend it's a relish and add a tiny bit of minced red onion to it. Yum!

SusieQ

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #2 on: December 27, 2010, 11:59:58 AM »
Turkey croquettes (my personal fav!)
Love this one, too!! Yummy!!
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milla

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2010, 01:41:33 PM »
You know, I have been thinking of turkey croquettes too. Or Turkey meatballs!mince the turkey, add some breads crumbs, onion , herbs (thyme? oregano?) garlic, bind it all with egg etc
But I have just been asked to do the turkey curry again!
So it's turkey curry time.

makinalist

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #4 on: December 27, 2010, 03:45:49 PM »
We have ham for Christmas dinner...problem solved!
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Kelly

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #5 on: December 27, 2010, 03:48:47 PM »
We alternate between tenderloin and rib roast.

Tupelo

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2010, 07:19:35 PM »
We are still kind of sick of Thanksgiving leftovers by the time Christmas comes around. :)  We, too, alternate between a crown rib roast with Yorkshire pudding and a ham dinner for Christmas day. DH does the ham, and he makes a ham gravy that's amazing. He bastes with pineapple juice 3 times during the baking and mixes the pan drippings with spicy mustard and his own "secret" seasonings. It's uniquely his, he's not sharing, and we look forward to it every other year. This year he served it with classic sides: asparagus w/ hollandaise and potatoes au gratin.

My family's favorite use of leftover turkey is Jambalaya with turkey and andouille sausage. Everyone's recipe for Jambalaya varies, but here is the basic:

Saute bell peppers (2, any color) with a whole red onion (diced) in a couple tbsp. olive oil until they are sweated and soft. Add the cloves of a garlic head, minced. Saute at least 3 minutes.

Add meat: coins of andoille (or the meat from the casings) and saute untll everything is browned and fragrant.

Add the heat: white pepper, black pepper, cayenne, smoky paprika, oregano, thyme (all to taste - or smell!).

Deglaze the pot with beer or wine. Stir in 3 cups of uncooked rice until coated. Add 6 cups of turkey broth, bring to boil, cover and turn the heat down low to simmer for 20 minutes. Add pieces of shredded leftover turkey to the top of the pot after 15 minutes.

Remove from heat and let stand covered for 10 minutes before serving.

We like this with cornbread.
« Last Edit: December 27, 2010, 07:33:01 PM by Tupelo »
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milla

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2010, 12:03:44 PM »
 I had never thought of jambalaya... now that's a great idea! I am definitely trying that!Thanks.

Styyna

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #8 on: December 28, 2010, 04:34:33 PM »


My family's favorite use of leftover turkey is Jambalaya with turkey and andouille sausage. Everyone's recipe for Jambalaya varies, but here is the basic:

[Left out generous sharing of recipe]

This sounds wonderful. I should look it up for myself but what is deglazing, please? I've heard of it in this context and I'm not sure what that means. Thanks!
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makeupmaven

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #9 on: December 28, 2010, 05:39:55 PM »
I believe deglazing is using a liquid to scrape all the bits and pieces that are stuck to the pan, like when you are making turkey gravy. I'm sure one of the chefs here can explain it better than I.
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Styyna

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #10 on: December 28, 2010, 05:44:42 PM »
I believe deglazing is using a liquid to scrape all the bits and pieces that are stuck to the pan, like when you are making turkey gravy. I'm sure one of the chefs here can explain it better than I.

So in Tupelo's recipe, is the liquid used in deglazing (this is what I do when I make something like a roux from drippings) subtracted from the total liquid or is it just not enough to worry about?

Thanks for the answer.
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Tupelo

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #11 on: December 28, 2010, 05:45:07 PM »
I believe deglazing is using a liquid to scrape all the bits and pieces that are stuck to the pan, like when you are making turkey gravy. I'm sure one of the chefs here can explain it better than I.

That's exactly right - pour in about a half cup of wine or beer and stir it in briskly, scraping the bottom of the pan for about a minute. It will blend in any of the caramelized bits of veggies and sausage browning.

ETA: The deglazing liquid is not subtracted. You still add 2 cups of broth for each cup of rice you use.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2010, 06:52:09 PM by Tupelo »
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Kelly

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #12 on: December 28, 2010, 06:00:15 PM »
I deglaze every time I make a steak in the skillet. Not only does it make a quick and lovely sauce, it means I can practically wipe the pan clean with a paper towel!

I especially like deglazing with sherry and butter. Yum.

Oh, how the cats hate that first sizzle as the booze hits the hot pan!

Tupelo

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2010, 06:53:44 PM »
One further note:

The only proportion in this recipe that matters is the ratio of 2:1 (broth to rice). It's  foolproof, and you can use as little or as much meat, veggies, seasonings as you wish. Of note, the rice will absorb all or most of the liquid during the 20 minute simmer. You just turn it down low and walk away... no peeking, no stirring. Much like its ancestor (the Spanish paella), it's OK if the rice is a little browned at the bottom. It just makes the dish more savory. Just give it a good stir before serving. Foolproof. :)
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makinalist

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Re: turkey leftovers
« Reply #14 on: December 28, 2010, 07:02:05 PM »
I like to make Jambalaya with all kinds of leftover meat.  In fact, I prefer it to have two or three different ones in it.
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