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Author Topic: Discussion of House of Mirth  (Read 3801 times)

Kelly

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« on: December 28, 2010, 07:45:24 PM »
I am reading House of Mirth by Edith Wharton (for the second time), and Why We Get Fat by Gary Taubes arrived today, so that's next.

Poppyfields

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #1 on: December 28, 2010, 08:13:14 PM »
Z, you have gotten me interested in Edith Wharton through your much earlier recommendation.  I made sure to download a few on my Kindle.  DS went back to grad school today, so I will have time to begin reading on my new toy.

Shall I start with House of Mirth?
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Kelly

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #2 on: December 28, 2010, 08:20:38 PM »
House of Mirth would be a great place to start.

Have you seen the film with Gillian Anderson? It might be worth seeing first, unless you like to be surprised by endings. She really nailed the brittle characteristics of Lily Bart, and the story stays close to the book. Eric Stoltz is excellent, as well.

The first time I read HoM I enjoyed it very much, but reading it again after having seen the film puts things in a new light.

I don't usually watch movies before reading books, and I never recommend that order, but I'd make an exception here.

makinalist

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #3 on: December 28, 2010, 09:57:10 PM »
I agree with reading this one first.  If you decide you like her, read Ethan Frome and Age of Innocence (her Pulitzer-winner).
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Poppyfields

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2010, 11:08:52 PM »
House of Mirth it is.  Thanks Listy & ZZ.

Don't really know how I've missed Wharton for so long.  I love stories set in earlier times as much for the historical details, mannerisms and customs as the storyline.  And a well made movie can help you to see the sumptuous interiors and costumes.   :beercheer:
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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2011, 05:34:23 PM »
I just finished reading House of Mirth around 4AM this morning. They really did keep the movie true to the book, including dialog.

Poppyfields

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2011, 08:11:50 PM »
I will have to look up the movie (Netflix, right?).  I finished House of Mirth (quite the ironic title!) 2 weeks ago and enjoyed it a lot.  I cannot imagine how they put her clever use of language into a movie, though.  My first big laugh was when she talked about how he wore his expensive suit like he was upholstered.   :lol:

I understood her plotting and the characteristics of her heroine better upon retrospect.  While reading, I was having a hard time believing how a girl so seemingly shallow would not look at those letters.  Wharton got so much of human nature down perfectly - but once she did not burn them, I can't believe she did not read them.   Sure it spoke to her ultimate 'goodness' and tragedy of her death - but it did not quite ring true to me.

Also, I kept wondering about the men who 'just wanted her to talk to them' - and the scene where she was tricked to her friends house but only hubby was home - was Wharton just being 'wink wink' delicate in accordance to the times she wrote in ? or am I really to believe that the man was just desperate for companionship a single girl could give without ruining her marriage chances!? 

During the narrative I was frustrated by how sanctimonious the lawyer was, and what bad choices she made - but this was all part of Wharton's plan, no doubt.

I loved the language, and will read Age of Innocence next.

On my vacation this past week I read The Moonstone, reportedly the first detective novel.  It had some good twists, and I was duly frustrated by some of those characters too.   :grin:  I approve of the ending, though.
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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #7 on: January 22, 2011, 09:34:59 PM »
I understood her plotting and the characteristics of her heroine better upon retrospect.  While reading, I was having a hard time believing how a girl so seemingly shallow would not look at those letters.  Wharton got so much of human nature down perfectly - but once she did not burn them, I can't believe she did not read them.   Sure it spoke to her ultimate 'goodness' and tragedy of her death - but it did not quite ring true to me.

I thought it was the only possible way to end! She had no money, no prospects, her reputation was so shot that even Rosedale took her to an out-of-the-way tearoom when he ran into her one night when she left Madame Regina's. And she was too proud to take the help of her friends--including a bailout from Rosedale. It's hard to know if it was suicide--I don't think so, but the "It's a great blessing" statement at the end, when Selden went to profess his love and support too late, was a statement rife with double entendre.

As for the letters, she knew what they were and didn't want to know any more because it would have been too painful for her. She was always in love with Selden. It comes across much better in the film, but it's there in the book if you read between the lines. Lily didn't use the letters to gain back Bertha's backing because she did not want to betray Selden.

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Also, I kept wondering about the men who 'just wanted her to talk to them' - and the scene where she was tricked to her friends house but only hubby was home - was Wharton just being 'wink wink' delicate in accordance to the times she wrote in ? or am I really to believe that the man was just desperate for companionship a single girl could give without ruining her marriage chances!? 

That's the crux of the whole story! Gus lied to her with the sole purpose of getting into her pants! Lily truly believed Judy Trenor was at home, but she continually used bad judgment, so going to the Trenor's townhouse after 10PM was a bad choice. She was a weak person who lacked confidence and used her snobbery to cover up for it. She succumbed to peer pressure and lost all that money at cards, so she could also just easily let Gus guilt her into accompanying him to his house. She did feel guilty for constantly trying to avoid Gus because somewhere inside, she did know that all that money he gave her was too good to be true.

So what Gus wanted was a little nookie for his "keeping" her. He felt it was his right. Lily assumed he had invested her own money, and she did not realize until that night that he had been giving her money. That right there was a reputation killer and the reason Judy dropped her.

Going abroad on the Dorsett's yacht was another horrible choice (her sole purpose was to keep George distracted while Bertha had a fling with Ned). That was another major turning point because Bertha lied about Lily and George in order to cover up the fact that she stayed out all night.

Lily was proud and naive, and she was also in major denial a lot of the time (where her "investment" payouts really came from, Aunt Julia's waning affections, how scheming Bertha was, Grace Stepney's duplicity). What I didn't understand is why she never defended herself. I guess in those times, it was pointless as it would only serve to make it sound like she protested too much.

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During the narrative I was frustrated by how sanctimonious the lawyer was, and what bad choices she made - but this was all part of Wharton's plan, no doubt.

I absolutely agree about her bad choices, but I didn't see Selden as sanctimonious, merely cautious and perhaps overly concerned about decorum and appearances. He was very much in love with her (and she with him), but she was convinced only a rich husband would do, and Selden had nothing to offer her in that way. She'd have lived a middle class life, and she wanted luxury, which is why she made the unfortunate choice of going to work for Mrs. Hatch at the Emporium.

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On my vacation this past week I read The Moonstone, reportedly the first detective novel.  It had some good twists, and I was duly frustrated by some of those characters too.   :grin:  I approve of the ending, though.

Wilkie Collins,right? If you liked that, try The Woman in White--an excellent mystery.

Poppyfields

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2011, 10:30:07 PM »
Good summary, ZZ.
I probably was not too clear - I felt that was the only way it could end, too.  I meant that if one really did not want to know, and protect Seldon, she would not have stopped herself from burning the letters.  All those nights of insomnia - wouldn't she want to know more about him?  Curiosity killed stronger cats!   :rofl:

Bad choices galore:
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she did not realize until that night that he had been giving her money. That right there was a reputation killer and the reason Judy dropped her.
If she really thought that Gus was investing her money, and Judy liked her distracting her grumpy hubby - why oh why did she not keep going to Judy's parties and "earning" his investing services with her charming company?  Her distance made Judy suspicious, right?

She went on that cruise to run away from her troubles, and from Rosedale - only to find more troubles.  We needed layer upon layer of tragedy for our heroine.   :grin:

Now that I have some distance, and had time to nit pick, it doesn't seem realistic that she would still be unmarried at 30 if marrying rich was her goal.  Back then a single 29 year old would have been a old maid, surely.  One would think 25 would be a panic age for a woman then.  If she was aware enough to not settle on a rich twit (knowing Seldon as a better man) why did she persist in insisting on marrying rich and driving Seldon away?

Short answer - the story would not work.   :lol:  And I really did enjoy reading it.

What I meant by sanctimonious is that he enjoyed ripping her choices and showing her better but then never offered a choice to her, even when a mere lawyer could offer her a better life than her working girl period could.  She was absolutely certain he no longer cared by then.  So he was too aloof for a man that was in love, IMHO.  But that allowed for the heart wrenching scene of running to her too late.  So it was good for the story.   :wink:

I read Woman in White last summer.  The thing that bugged me about that plot was why did her father promise her to that gold digger anyway?  I kept expecting that he must have had something on the father, and to put him off he promised him his daughter and all the money when he died.  Something from their war years, like in The Moonstone.   But it was never explained why her father wished for her to marry him.  Apart from that, it was a good story.

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makinalist

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2011, 12:07:31 AM »
The rest of us will be right over here if you two need us for anything, okay?  Anything at all.

Carry on. :D
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Kelly

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #10 on: January 23, 2011, 10:09:38 AM »
WARNING! Long, boring post ahead. I am absolutely fascinated by the psychology of this book, and this is a fascinating discussion, because Poppy is helping me see stuff I missed!. :D

I probably was not too clear - I felt that was the only way it could end, too.  I meant that if one really did not want to know, and protect Seldon, she would not have stopped herself from burning the letters.  All those nights of insomnia - wouldn't she want to know more about him?  Curiosity killed stronger cats!   :rofl:

I'm pretty sure we all know that you and I would have read them. :lol:

Do we know for certain that she didn't read them? I don't recall one way or the other, but perhaps Wharton thought it best to leave that bit to the imagination. I can't help but think that her reader audience of that time might have known instinctively what Lily would do, but we modern people aren't in touch with those social practices (and how bloody constrained they were!). We're of the generation where "if it bleeds, it leads" lol.

Poor Lily held onto those letters too long, and it was too late to save her reputation. It was Rosedale, of all people, who told her to use them, but she had already sunk very low by then, working in the back room of a hat shop.

The most frustrating thing about the Bart-Selden relationship is that they both loved one another, but they were both too proud/fearful to make the first step. (Hints of Mulder and Scully? Castle and Beckett? :D )  Lily hinted at her feelings strongly in the beginning ("You can't possibly want to marry me," "No I absolve you of that notion.") but always said it in a way that both discouraged him and kept him dangling.

I get the strong sense from the book that Lily felt a need to keep up appearances, even to herself. Her parents were the "poor relations" but also social climbers who taught her to be shallow. When he father went bankrupt, and after they had both died, no one wanted Lily--who I believe was an adult then. Wasn't she 18? So she very likely spent the rest of her time being a people pleaser, especially after even her mother had made it clear to her that her beauty was her best (only) asset. She was weak, made bad choices, and could not say no because no one taught her. Her friends didn't give a rat's ass about her welfare.

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Bad choices galore:
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she did not realize until that night that he had been giving her money. That right there was a reputation killer and the reason Judy dropped her.
If she really thought that Gus was investing her money, and Judy liked her distracting her grumpy hubby - why oh why did she not keep going to Judy's parties and "earning" his investing services with her charming company?  Her distance made Judy suspicious, right?

I've thought about this some more, and I now think that Judy had cooled toward Lily for other reasons first, long before Gus's money. Lily continually straddled upper crust society with the climbers by associating with Mrs. Fisher and the Gormers. These people were invited to parties as amusement, but they weren't seen as "one of them." Also, it was clear that Judy thought Lily a fool for the way she handled the Percy Gryce affair, coupled with her very bad judgment at alienating Bertha Dorsett over Selden's visit to Bellomont on the same weekend. The very rich in NY stuck to their own kind, and if Judy had to choose between Bertha and Lily, she'd choose Bertha. In fact, she did.

In any case, it was not Judy who needed her husband to be distracted, it was Bertha (although I found it odd that it was accepted that Lily be used to amuse other womens' husbands). At that fateful weekend at Bellomont, Lily came down one morning to help Judy write/answer letters (the first indication that Lily was never seen as a equal-she's acting as Judy's secretary). Judy mentioned that Bertha was in a foul mood because Selden wasn't coming, and Judy said she would ask him again. Lily begged her not to, but she must have because he came anyway. Or maybe he came just to see Lily--I think he said as much later. But here we get another glimpse into Lily's rigid middle-class need to keep up appearances because she would not gossip with Judy, saying the entire discussion was odious to her. Judy was telling her that the Dorset-Selden affair appeared to be over on Selden's part, but that Bertha was still trying to cling on.

That was a bad weekend for Lily, as she made two huge mistakes that shaped the rest of her short life: she scared off Gryce and she pissed off Bertha by "stealing" Selden away from her. The book makes us think that Lily purposely skipped church in order to make Gryce miss her all the more, but she didn't really want him. What she most wanted was to be the center of attention, to have her beauty reflected back to her in the eyes of others, and one way was to tease and flirt with Selden--a man she loved but had no intention of marrying. And so she made an enemy of Bertha after she interrupted them in the study and then disingenuously announced she'd walk to church, all the while knowing Selden would follow her. That was the afternoon they all but professed their love for one another, but Lily also made it clear she needed to live a life of luxury, and Selden could not provide that.

If you recall, Bertha was so angry that she told Gryce about Lily's affinity for gambling, and that killed that relationship. In fact, he left early. It also made Judy look at Lily differently because she knew Lily would not marry Selden, so why not let Bertha think Selden had come to Bellomont for Bertha? That Bertha was a viper, and I wish Wharton had written a sequel just about her, lol! In fact, Judy said that Lily was a fool for making that woman her enemy.

It is not really clear to me when Judy became suspicious of Lily. I don't think she ever thought there was anything sexual going on, but Judy hated him giving money to their friends. Wasn't she completely dismissive of Mrs. Fisher and how much she annoyed Gus by always asking for "investments?" I suspect Judy continued to cool toward Lily as she made one bad mistake after another, and the hints that something improper went on on the yacht between Lily and George Dorset (after Bertha would not let her board that night) was the icing on the cake.

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She went on that cruise to run away from her troubles, and from Rosedale - only to find more troubles.  We needed layer upon layer of tragedy for our heroine.   :grin:

Exactly! Right from the frying pan into the fire for the lovely, sweet, vapid Lily.

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Now that I have some distance, and had time to nit pick, it doesn't seem realistic that she would still be unmarried at 30 if marrying rich was her goal.  Back then a single 29 year old would have been a old maid, surely.  One would think 25 would be a panic age for a woman then.  If she was aware enough to not settle on a rich twit (knowing Seldon as a better man) why did she persist in insisting on marrying rich and driving Seldon away?

Wharton writes a lot about women with an independent streak (wait until you meet Ellen Olenska in The Age of Innocence!), and I suspect she was letting us know Lily had not married at 29 because she did not want to settle for the same boring life she saw around her. What Lily should have done was spend more time in Europe and marry a rich, titled man!

When the book was describing Lily's earlier life, it mentioned that she did not have a female sponsor. A mother would have promoted her daughter and made all the right introductions, but her mother was dead. I believe her aunt gave Lily a coming out party and then that was it. She had no interest in helping Lily make the proper connections, which seems odd, given Lily was a burden to her. The life of Julia Penniston is a mystery, and I wish Wharton had given us a better idea of what made her tick, other than her extreme moral outrage.

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What I meant by sanctimonious is that he enjoyed ripping her choices and showing her better but then never offered a choice to her, even when a mere lawyer could offer her a better life than her working girl period could.  She was absolutely certain he no longer cared by then.  So he was too aloof for a man that was in love, IMHO.  But that allowed for the heart wrenching scene of running to her too late.  So it was good for the story.   :wink:

Yes, that's the fun part. We need to take a critical analysis class on this so we can both have it pointed out to us what we are missing! :lol: He did enjoy ripping apart the life she chose, as he had a lot of disdain for it. In some way, I think that is what made her respect him the most. She thought that life was her only choice, but I get the sense even she found it tiresome. But it was weird the way they treated one another. Stupid pride.

I do think that at one point he told her that whatever he had to offer was hers (that weekend at Bellomont?), but he immediately discounted it by saying he knew it wasn't enough, and she agreed. It's like they took coquetry and teasing to an entirely new level. He actually did stop caring for her after even he had no choice but to believe the rumors about her and Gus, but she never knew that. The night she ended up at the Trenor's house alone with Gus, she was horrified when she discovered he had lied to her. She even mentioned how inappropriate it was to him and demanded that he call a cab. And it was just her dumb luck that when she alighted the cab, Selden and Van Alstyn saw her from down the street. THEY new Trenor was alone, and they also knew of the money, so they would have both assumed she was sleeping with him to pay off the debt. That part in the book was handled very quickly, maybe in a sentence or two, but it was an extremely important passage because that's when Selden's heart moved on.

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I read Woman in White last summer.  The thing that bugged me about that plot was why did her father promise her to that gold digger anyway?  I kept expecting that he must have had something on the father, and to put him off he promised him his daughter and all the money when he died.  Something from their war years, like in The Moonstone.   But it was never explained why her father wished for her to marry him.  Apart from that, it was a good story.

I forgot about that part. I have it on my kindle, so I need to re-read it, but I have started reading Wharton's Custom of the Country. I am hoping for a reappearance of Bertha Dorsett. :lol:

Poppyfields

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #11 on: January 23, 2011, 02:37:14 PM »
Yes, the psychology of human reactions is great here.  So much of what Wharton writes rings true today, and some, bound by the mores of Gilded Age manners is harder to understand.

I believe the idea that inviting a 'sweet young thing' to keep ones boring, grumpy hubby off ones back rings true.  Clearly these are not simply love matches - these gals were directed by their mothers to matches that would be good for the family and her social standing, just like Lily wished.  The wives had heard all the stories, all the complaints, all the jokes from the men - they were no longer amusing.  So bringing in some new ears to flatter the man, and keep him from bitching about how much this was costing him was golden.

A middle aged man, feeling taken for granted and passed over by the women-folk would get a needed ego boost from the innocent attentions of a pretty girl.  Everyone wants to feel appreciated, clever, amusing, attractive.  After all, his family fortune and his ability to maintain/enlarge it enabled everyone else to live this way - yet he was 'boring' to them.   I feel that it was shown on page that Lily could have easily managed Gus by making a public fuss over him at the parties while maintaining personal boundaries.  He went a long way to please her and deserve her respect and she began hiding right away.  So her distance managed to enforce his 'entitlement' feelings, especially as she kept taking the financial rewards.

I also suspect the wives were able to tolerate this service from girls actively looking for victims meal tickets hubbies, because they knew their own man was safe.  When the girl turned down prospect after good prospect, and was in her prime beauty - a wife could get suspicious and protective.

It was not clear to me how long Lily knew Seldon.   ???  As I began reading, it seemed they were mere casual acquaintances, as they did not frequent the same crowd.   The scene on the train with Gryce made it seem she could pick up any man at the drop of a hat, and tie him up for delivery to the altar in a weekend.  So my initial impression was not of closeness, but sparking off someone you might be attracted to but did not agree with.  There was a definite societal distance there.

I do understand how a man walls off his feelings for a woman that he understands he will never have.  I can see how his tearing down of her world was a defense mechanism.  I wonder if it went deeper than this for him, though.  Because if he despised this world so much, why did he keep circling around it?  Why did he attend the functions?  Just to see Lily?  Just to see Bertha?  I wonder if he did not feel shut out and jealous himself, even though he was a peace and liked being a lawyer.  Might not there be some resentment of how such dumb, vapid people had so much money when a clever hardworking man could not.  

So this idea brings Seldon down in my estimation of the perfect romantic lead.  He scorned wealth but he hung around it.  He loved her so he denigrated her goals, told her his way was much better, but did not show her it was a viable option for her?   I have known guys like this, that decide to hate what they cannot have and decide what they are left with is more virtuous.   Seldon could not have her because he was not rich, so she was silly.

Rosedale was the example of the A-type that never took 'No' for an answer, and could parlay anything into an advancement.  Even though he was an outsider, he was shown doing rather well for himself.  Kinda creepy how he knew everything that was going on, and understood his targets.  I wonder if he put the idea of selling the letters into the charwoman's head.

What my 21st century mind has the most trouble with is how Lily 'knew' this life was shallow, and kept sabotaging her marriage prospects, but could not change her view of a middle class life.  She surely knew that she could have any man, and could have Seldon if she just accepted the fact he was a mere lawyer. She wanted things both ways and could not realize this.  The other women accepted that their rich hubbies were not the most satisfying of men, but they wanted that life.  I bet if Lily had married in her early 20's she would have adjusted just fine.  

But the tragic impossible love story needs its misunderstandings to pull at your heart.  And in this respect, House of Mirth delivered.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 09:13:47 PM by Poppyfields »
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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #12 on: January 23, 2011, 03:02:27 PM »
Excellent insight, Pops, especially about young nubiles making the rich old duds feel special and interesting. I could see that as somewhat of a relief for the wives.

I read HoM the first time many years ago, and then I saw the movie, bought it, and have watched it at least once a year since, crying my eyes out every time--especially over Lily's "I tried" scene at Selden's apartment before the letters go bye bye.

The film shows Selden in a slightly more sympathetic light, so I am sure I had that in the back of my mind when I read the book again last week.

I also felt a lot of anger and frustration toward both of them, him for not helping her when she so desperately needed it and no one else would come to her aid (showing even he succumbed to snobbery given she had sunk so low) and she for being to self destructive.

Rosedale was really the only person who could have saved her. His money would have given Lily the power to go up against Bertha, but on her own, she was no match. It was suicide to toss those letters, but in the film, they dramatized it to make it look like she tried but the Dorsetts had gone to the country for the season.

The book would have been so much fun if there had been a polite, fierce, intellectual cat fight, but tragedy and unrequited love make for a better story.

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #13 on: January 23, 2011, 03:04:30 PM »
BTW, I got the sense Lily knew Selden since childhood. His cousin Gerty had known Lily that long, and I think they were distant relatives of the Stepneys. Wasn't Grace Stepney (the one who inherited all) Julia Penniston's niece or cousin?

Poppyfields

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Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #14 on: January 23, 2011, 06:22:08 PM »
The book would have been so much fun if there had been a polite, fierce, intellectual cat fight,
:excellent:  Had she married Rosedale they would have been an unstoppable pair - and basically the Babe Paley story.  But she could not stand him, so since he was a male version of herself, she was rejecting that part of herself, right?  Are we to take away from this that being a 'strong man' he was able to stick to his plan and rise up while Lily, being a 'weak woman' allowed love, conscience, & empathy to derail and ruin her?  Sorry, I'm sure I'm over thinking this.  Best to let it stand as a tragic romantic story.

« Last Edit: January 24, 2011, 09:13:25 PM by Poppyfields »
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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #15 on: January 24, 2011, 04:34:59 PM »
I split this discussion of the Edith Wharton novel House of Mirth from the larger topic of What Are You Reading?, simply because it deserved its own place in the Entertainment Board.  We plan to do this whenever a book or other art form inspires an in-depth conversation within a topic.

In this case, we hope that those wanting to find new book suggestions may continue their search in the original topic, while anyone interested in The House of Mirth may follow it up in the new topic.

Who knows?  We might even end up with our own The Timeless Beauty Book Club!
-Canie

Kelly

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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #16 on: January 24, 2011, 08:08:25 PM »
Thanks, Canie.

Now. Who wants to tackle Atlas Shrugged? :evil:

Poppyfields

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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #17 on: January 24, 2011, 09:27:39 PM »
Couldn't make it thru that one.   :rollseyes:

Glad you gals mentioned I should begin with House of Mirth, I started Age of Innocence today and am having a harder time getting into this one.  I feel it is starting out slowly, but I'll hang in there.

One part of HoM I admired was when Lily confessed to her cousin that it just seemed that the hangers on like herself life off of the rich for free.  But in truth she needed the right clothes, needed to participate in the gambling, needed money for tips, etc.  That gave a more rounded picture of her life and some of the other young folks that circle around the rich circles. 
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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #18 on: January 24, 2011, 10:41:48 PM »
Couldn't make it thru that one.   :rollseyes:

Nor I. And yet I was unable to put down The Fountainhead. Weird.

I'm glad we had this discussion, Poppy. You enlightened me and forced me to look at things I hadn't considered, such as now similar Lily and Rosedale actually were.

I always liked him in the movie. :D

Poppyfields

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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2011, 03:16:54 PM »
Me too.  It helps to organize your thoughts to write something down to share, and reading others thoughts helps to see the story more fully.

I looked for HoM on Netflix, alas it is not on instant view.  I'll eventually get it into the rotation for mail delivery - DH and I are on a Classic Movie kick - replacing paying for Turner Classic Movies channel. 
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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #20 on: January 25, 2011, 04:57:55 PM »
I looked for HoM on Netflix, alas it is not on instant view. 

You haven't seen it?? :eek: You might find that one is worth owning.

Poppyfields

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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #21 on: January 25, 2011, 09:34:38 PM »
Alas, no.  I'm an incomplete woman.   :rofl:

I'm sure they emphasize the romance in the movie.  Reading the book first gave me a chance to think more about motives rather than be awed by gorgeous actors, costumes and sets.   :wink: 
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There is nothing wrong with you. Not one single thing. Any fault lies with the fashion/cosmetic/marketing industry that has trained you with false proof to believe that you’re not perfect.

Kelly

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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #22 on: January 26, 2011, 09:01:56 AM »
True it is lush, but they did an excellent job. The film is ALL about relationships. It's fascinating--one of the best period pieces I have ever seen, and I have a thang for those (a milk crate full of them).

Poppyfields

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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #23 on: March 03, 2011, 11:27:56 AM »
Today I read the post by a High WASP writing a blog entitled Privilege.  Quite witty - you might enjoy the blog.

Anyway, her father, a professor, wrote an essay about Wharton, Age of Innocence - book and movie - and how it related to his grandmother's experience in that world.  

If you are interested, jump the link here:  http://amidprivilege.com/2011/03/guest-post-father-professor-discusses-age-innocence-wharton-scorsese/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+-Privilege+%28-+Privilege%29
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There is nothing wrong with you. Not one single thing. Any fault lies with the fashion/cosmetic/marketing industry that has trained you with false proof to believe that you’re not perfect.

Kelly

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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #24 on: March 03, 2011, 10:54:35 PM »
Pops, that link didn't work, but I think this is the right spot: http://amidprivilege.com/2011/03/guest-post-father-professor-discusses-age-innocence-wharton-scorsese/

I bookmarked it so I can read it tomorrow. I can't wait!
« Last Edit: March 03, 2011, 11:08:44 PM by Zuzu's Petals »

Kelly

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Re: Discussion of House of Mirth
« Reply #25 on: March 03, 2011, 11:08:27 PM »
I couldn't resist. I haven't read the guest post yet, but I looked around her blog, and it looks interesting. She's a DAR. So is my husband, lol. I think I already know what shoes to wear with navy, but I look forward to reading about her paternal relatives' age of innocence.

Now off to bed and more reading tomorrow.