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Author Topic: E-readers and tablets  (Read 3771 times)

classicbooks

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Re: E-readers and tablets
« Reply #30 on: February 13, 2012, 08:30:46 PM »
I have an iPad 2 and downloaded a couple of books on the Kindle app just to see what all the fuss was about.   I have decided I do not like ebooks.   I like the feel of a real book in my hand, and I want to be able to loan it out to those who do not have an e-reader.   And you would think since they do not have printing/shipping costs that ebooks should be much less expensive than they are.   Most books I read I order as used on Amazon for only a few dollars, and then I have real, not virtual copies.

Also, I can't help but imagine that future generations will be amazed at what a real book looks like, they might have to go to a museum to see one.  I envision scenarios like the movie Farenheit 451 and the Book of Eli, where books have been destroyed and only a precious few are in existence and coveted.  I also see myself, and others like me, as 'the keeper of the books' for that futuristic apocalyptic day when virtual books are inaccessible due to lack of electricity and batteries and real books are few and far between, and there is a renewed nostalgia for all things quaint and old  :wink:

makinalist

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Re: E-readers and tablets
« Reply #31 on: February 13, 2012, 10:17:41 PM »
This may not be such a farfetched notion.  I have a friend who goes around to book sales at libraries and buys the classics.  She has a son whom she fears won't have any real books when he is grown.  Who's to say it won't happen?
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Swest

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Re: E-readers and tablets
« Reply #32 on: February 14, 2012, 08:28:07 AM »
Not to mention an author cannot sign an e-book :lol:
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Une Femme

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  • Posts: 502
Re: E-readers and tablets
« Reply #33 on: February 16, 2012, 05:04:30 PM »
I can't imagine my i-pad completely replacing hard cover books.  There are few things more beautiful, design-wise, than a gorgeous bookcase filled with your curated treasure trove.  We have ours in the dining room, since I love to look at the book spines while I'm eating; I find it relaxing somehow.

What the i-pad, kindles, et al, are great for, is travel.  We're going to France for a month in the fall, and just think how much more room I will have in my luggage for shopping if I'm not schlepping half a dozen books with me!

CathyEarnshaw

  • Gold Member
  • Posts: 110
Re: E-readers and tablets
« Reply #34 on: February 20, 2012, 04:29:05 AM »
I've had a Kindle for 2 years and would never be without one now. I use it every single day and I don't miss books in the least.
I'm an avid reader, however; once I've read a book I rarely reread it. Consequently, I find books piling up on my bookshelves and taking up too much space and I find myself constantly running to the Goodwill with boxes of books.
 I read in bed every night and find the Kindle much lighter to hold than a book. I also love that if I finish a book, I can...without leaving my bed...upload a new book to my Kindle and resume reading within seconds.
  My daughter, a literary arts student, said that she abhorred E-readers and would never have one. She loved the feel and even the smell of a real book and she felt very sentimental about books.
 I got her a Kindle for Christmas and she has already completely changed her tune. She is in love with her Kindle and uses it daily :grin:
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makinalist

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Re: E-readers and tablets
« Reply #35 on: February 20, 2012, 01:37:05 PM »
She loved the feel and even the smell of a real book and she felt very sentimental about books.
I think this is the issue, in a nutshell.  We are all sentimental about books, as are our adult children.  Their children, however, may not have that attachment.  I do have a big box of my son's childhood books saved for my grandchildren, though. :)
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Styyna

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  • Posts: 3729
  • "steena"
Re: E-readers and tablets
« Reply #36 on: February 22, 2012, 12:25:55 PM »
I have an iPad 2 and downloaded a couple of books on the Kindle app just to see what all the fuss was about.   I have decided I do not like ebooks.   I like the feel of a real book in my hand, and I want to be able to loan it out to those who do not have an e-reader.   And you would think since they do not have printing/shipping costs that ebooks should be much less expensive than they are.   Most books I read I order as used on Amazon for only a few dollars, and then I have real, not virtual copies.

Also, I can't help but imagine that future generations will be amazed at what a real book looks like, they might have to go to a museum to see one.  I envision scenarios like the movie Farenheit 451 and the Book of Eli, where books have been destroyed and only a precious few are in existence and coveted.  I also see myself, and others like me, as 'the keeper of the books' for that futuristic apocalyptic day when virtual books are inaccessible due to lack of electricity and batteries and real books are few and far between, and there is a renewed nostalgia for all things quaint and old  :wink:

I, too, love the feel and appearance of real books. I have a huge, heavy box of books from my father's youth, all in a language I can't read, that I am loathe to part with and not just because they were my father's. They are very old and likely many of them are out of print now.

I've never enjoyed lengthy reading on a computer screen and have printed off reams of pages over the years so that I could hold the hard copy in my hands and read in a comfortable place at my leisure without the glare of an upright monitor.

Still, when I received a Kindle Fire this past Christmas I didn't hesitate to try it out. I was a little skeptical but also curious. I have found that I love downloading books in a minute - most of them free so far - and then being able to tote my Kindle around just like a real book. I found a setting to make the background less glaringly white and I can adjust the print size so that, at night when my eyes are tired from my computer monitor, it is easier to read. I have read more books since getting the Kindle than in the past few years combined.

As far as the price of books is concerned, the publishers are dictating the prices at which places like Amazon must sell many of the books. Amazon was big into $9.99 per book until the publishers stepped in and successfully insisted that they be allowed to set the prices. That explains the ridiculously high prices of eBooks compared to lovely hardcover editions.

My "post-apocalyptic" vision is more like Fahrenheit 451, where books are banned (if I remember my reading of the book correctly). Many electronic copies that take up a tiny fraction of space gives me hope that books and the ideas contained within will survive. Yes, I can see that a true apocalypse that results in the inability to obtain power would be a problem. But batteries and such aren't whiz-bang science any longer. I'm hopeful that we won't reach that point. :)

There are advantages and drawbacks to both forms. Hopefully there will be audiences for both forms for a long time to come.
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