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Author Topic: an amazing woman  (Read 2606 times)

milla

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an amazing woman
« on: March 12, 2014, 04:16:25 PM »

cara4art

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2014, 11:52:10 PM »
Wonderful article and woman! So glad to hear about someone as resourceful as this. Looking forward to reading more on her site/blog. Refreshing for once to hear about someone in lean circumstances making a serious go. Necessity is the mother of invention! Plus motivation! I agree with the fact that cooking has to be "less glossy", etc. in order to get people back into the kitchen to prepare their daily meals. There's so much stuff on the Internet and on TV cooking shows(although I don't own a TV personally) that it's easy to see how beginner cooks, or those who are tight straits time or money-wise might feel intimidated about even starting to prepare anything. On another angle, add to this the admonishments from various sources about perfect, absolutely sterling healthy eating(a lot of times from people on extreme health or training regimens), and people can easily feel like throwing in the towel if they can't be 100% PERFECT all the time. One has to start somewhere, educate oneself, and make a go of it with whatever one has, like this woman did.

Swest

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2014, 10:56:55 AM »
Sounds like sound advice. I agree so many shows make things more complicated than they need to be.  I thought I was the only one without a tv well i have one but its 20 plus years old and only 13 inches. :eek: I K horrors!  :o I prefer my laptop thank- you- very- much as I can do more things on it.
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cara4art

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2014, 11:48:40 AM »
@Swest: I'm a long-term no-TV person. Been TV-free since 1985 and never missed it ONE bit. The only time I see it is at someone else's place and even that is rare. I do catch some video clips of this or that on my computer, but I have yet to "watch a TV show" on it. As far as ditching, any magazines might be next. My husband gets way more than I do(I get exactly 2, and I'm catalog-free too). Life is a lot better without endless ads too. Ad-block+ is on my computer and makes for a much better web experience.
But back to simpler food, I'm in total agreement. Plus, if anyone is paying attention to how they feel as they age, simpler foods seem to agree more with one's digestion, and one starts appreciating simpler fare. A lot of the complicated dishes out there, while they might look amazing and be sort of tasty for a minute, are not conducive to health. Since I was in my 20s pretty much, I've been on the path of health rather than endless "gourmet" whatever in my food prep. That's not to say that my foods don't taste good - they do. But people do have to accustom their tastebuds to simpler more natural foods to begin with for that to happen. If one has spent years or decades eating processed junk, fast foods, or an endless succession of complicated gourmet recipes, then the transition IS challenging for a lot of people. But once done, usually people stay simpler because they get accustomed, and they FEEL a lot better too. Oh, and some weight might be lost as well. Just my humble thoughts here!:)

milla

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2014, 03:46:40 AM »
We do have a TV but I never sit down to watch it. I might watch something once a month, or even less. I do watch some series on the computer. Overall I think I prefer listening to the radio! but my husband likes watching sports and programmes about fishing and, of course, Dr. Who!
I thing Jack Monroe is a very brave woman, who literally pulled herself up by her boots strings from a very difficult situation. She is not afraid of speaking out and telling those who think that all unemployed people are wasters, that poverty can happen to anyone. There is something  very primordial about hunger;  having to count the pennies to buy some food, going without so that your child can have something to eat…this  is an experience  that marks people for ever: you can never forget it. Also children who experience poverty grow up a lot less confident than their peers.
A few years ago, in the course of a conversation with a parent, I found out that she just did not cook. ‘I am OK with house work, she said ‘but I cannot cook’.  So what did her children eat?  A meal at school during the week; the rest of the time they ate snacks and the odd take away.Now,  we are told constantly that we must not be judgemental, etc, so I made polite noises about fruit and vegetables, backed potatoes with fillings…  I wish I had just looked her in the eye and said: ‘If you can’t cook then you’d better learn p.d.q., it is not rocket science and you’ve got 4 kids. I’ll be round yours on Saturday with a bag of groceries.’
As it happens, after the summer break  her daughters came back to school so thin that we were really worried, in case they were anorexic. I spoke to the girls about their diet and found out that they didn’t even have a cooker. The family were referred to social services. I can’t help thinking that I could have avoided this if I had been a bit more direct and less ‘professional’.

makinalist

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2014, 01:29:05 PM »
Thank you for pointing her out to us, milla.  I doubt I would ever have seen her otherwise.  I agree she is amazing, if only because so few younger women are learning how to make do out of necessity.  No one has time to teach/learn domestic/survival skills any longer.  I remember my mother, when I was about four years old, being a single mom to me and my younger brother.  She wrote down all her expenses every week and had a book of 100 ways to fix hamburger.  Remember that one?

Unfortunately, hamburger is expensive these days. :eek:
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cara4art

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2014, 02:05:10 PM »
Indeed, about the relatively few younger women preparing things. There's been close to 2 generations now that don't have a clue about basic food prep. No, "nuking a frozen burrito" or pouring some hot water into a ramen cup doesn't count. Over on a simpler-living board, one woman commented that she was a social worker and that it was an uphill battle to educate people how to make their food stamp supplements go further by buying some basic raw materials and making things at home, as so many of the people she was dealing with just relied on snacks and processed junk from the corner store or something like that. My husband and I often comment there are whole legions of people for whom if one handed them a potato they'd have no idea what to do with it. But there is hope - there are some younger people who are re-learning things in the spirit of DIY, etc. and an even smaller group of highly-health-conscious young women(most notably yoga practitioners, gym goers, and some other fitness people)who are learning and implementing VERY healthy diets. Let's hope they follow through as good habits formed early will pay off for a lifetime!:)
@milla: so sorry to hear about those poor children - that sounds like outright neglect to me:(
Poverty does leave its marks - there are many aspects that stay with one even if one pulls out of it. I can attest to this after going through a lengthy period when I was younger of having highly unstable income and debt. Once I got my debt(which resulted from a rebellious period in my 20s and took YEARS to pay off) paid off, I went back to my frugal roots and STAYED there, even though I have SOME more money at my disposal. Kind of like staying on a permanent "diet". My husband tries to get me to loosen up a bit, but my frugal habits don't want to die. This is saying something, as he's pretty careful about he spends himself!

milla

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2014, 05:02:18 PM »
I never taught my children to cook (my mother never taught me to cook ) but I’d like to think that I taught them to how eat well and how to shop for food. As a child,  my parents really struggled to make ends meet; as a young woman,  I had to feed myself and my then- boyfriend on my meagre salary, for 2 years while he was studying (he eventually became a v. successful lawyer but by then we had broken up… ). And when my children were small I took a few years out to look after them. We weren’t poor but we had to be careful with money; we still managed to eat well.
I love good food and I am lucky to be able to afford it, but we are very careful and don’t waste anything. I might spend a bit more on food on weekends or special occasions but during the week we eat cheaply. It is possible to eat well on a budget if you have the patience to source your ingredients in markets and ethnic shops and if you take time to prepare food and try different things.
I have learned to cook with people from different ethnic backgrounds, Asian, Afro- Caribbean, Eastern European,  Mediterranean… cooking and sharing food is a joy and a pleasure!

denverly

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2014, 09:47:58 AM »
For me, every woman is amazing in their own little ways and I also agree that the woman mentioned in the article is indeed amazing. A woman who can do a lot of things and can portray love in every thing she does simply makes her wonderful.

gilberte

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #9 on: July 15, 2015, 11:35:31 AM »
I'm late to this threat, but thanks for posting this!  Though I am a Californian I rely on the Guardian for my news (go UK media!  I also listen to BBC Radio 4 :-) )  and have known about Jack and her writing for a while.  LOVE HER!  What a strong message and model for these celebrity retarded times! 

For my work and my interests I travel often in poor parts of the world and see what is available there, and how it affects the lives of people.  Jack's philosophy of food is so sane and humane.  In my part of the SF Bay Area we have several natural food stores that would make a third world citizen's jaw drop ... they are virtual food palaces with  amazing lighting, natural wood decor, skylights, wifi, beautiful music, plenty of room to stretch out with your computer and work,  organic, hormone-free ice cream bars, fresh bakeries, deli counters ... lovely seating areas with gorgeous plants so you feel you're in a lush garden.  This is all one store.  Plenty of free parking.  My friends from Paris visit and these natural food stores are their favorite places to spend the day.  There is nothing comparable in France, and I don't believe in Europe.  Many in the developed world do not understand how much of the world is starving, undernourished, suffering, and dying ... many animal species that have been made extinct due to climate change caused by our comfortable life style. 

Jack is one of my heroines.  Thanks for reminding me today.

milla

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #10 on: July 15, 2015, 12:26:13 PM »
Many people in European countries rely on food banks.  The UK is considered a wealthy country and yet many children do not have enough to eat here. We have breakfast clubs at schools in the UK and there are children who return from their summer holidays with a low BMI because they did not have their free school meal. I am not saying this to upset you: it is the reality.

gilberte

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2015, 12:26:39 PM »
oops, caught my typo :  'thread' not 'threat' but i imagine Jack would smile at this.  I also liked that Jack stopped doing twitter though she had tons of followers because of abuse.  People who cut their social media platforms often win my support. 

The US has similar statistics of poverty and malnutrition I would be sure.  I live in a wealthy area with good weather, so growing food is relatively easy and there is a huge market for it.   In defense of the luxury natural foods story I mentioned above, they give lots of food away and sponsor barbecues, buffets, all sorts of meals for nonprofits (charity fundraising organizations), and they send all the food (already prepared) to my local weekly seniors lunch.  And they provide lots of jobs to local people, *really* push local versus trucked in products, have huge solar panels on the roof and provide electricity for a portion of the community.  Still I am  always rolling my eyes when I go there (not regularly).  I have problems being from a wealthy place, knowing I have tons of advantages, and also knowing that at least 1/3 of the world is hungry, and another third spends too much for overly processed food from Walmart and friends because this is their only option.  Honestly, Walmart is now the biggest food marketer in Mexico. 

milla

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Re: an amazing woman
« Reply #12 on: July 17, 2015, 04:41:12 AM »
I read in the paper yesterday that a recent study shows that 2/3 of the children living in poverty have in fact working parents, so there goes the  myth of the unemployed, idle slob sitting on the couch in a dirty string vest. This government says that they are commited to raising the minimum wage, let's us hope they keep their promises. Still I can't see food banks closing down in the near future.