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Author Topic: Ruth Crilly (A Model Recommends) busted for hiding sponsorship  (Read 1377 times)

gilberte

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Ruth Crilly, A Model Recommends, was busted by the ASA (the FTC of the UK) for not being clear that she was sponsored by Proctor & Gamble, owners of many brands including Max Factor.  It was a Max Factor lipstick she was recommending in the vlog.  The said video was banned, the story made lots of (mainly UK) papers, and she says nothing at all about it on her blog.  She is continuing to show photos of her baby, her dog, her perfect country life and her huge collection of high end products.   I am sure she is making big money because so many women want to have the 'inside advice' of a model!  It has seemed obvious to me for years that Ruth was advertising, but many women fall for it.  They feel that her being a model means she is passing along to them inside secrets to beauty.

She was caught because a viewer reported the vlog to the ASA as being suspicious.  So, that's the good news; it only takes one viewer to make a report.

I've talked to several bloggers about this, it *totally* irritates us.  We all agree that if the FTC & ASA were to crack down on all beauty bloggers and vloggers who broke FTC/ASA laws, through not clearly stating that they receive affiliate income, through direct sponsorship and through receiving unacknowledged free samples (all of which are illegal according to ASA and FTC law), the internet jail would have to be huge.  And we understand there is little money or impetus to enforce these laws.  But !@#$%^&*()!!!!!   Why can't bloggers follow the law?

The few bloggers I know who do clearly state these things I continue to respect.  But they are mighty few and I see they don't get the numbers of viewers that someone like Ruth receives, because she keeps that fantasy of a luxury goods-filled life alive.   Viewers don't understand, I guess, how advertising works in the internet age.

I wonder why we're so enchanted with models?  Kate Moss didn't graduate from high school, flunked most of her classes, and can barely read, but so many women would love to be her, and even more women will buy any makeup product the young Kardashians use.  The MAC lipliner Kylie (youngest) uses has been backordered for months, for example.   

I'm a longtime, very serious environmentalist and the buying of so much stuff, the gas used to go get it, the spiraling superficiality, and the fact that it'll all end in landfills makes me livid.  Climate change is real and deadly, criminally serious, but most women in the US and Europe care more about their makeup than about the destruction of the environment.   Why?  I grew up in the 60s when we believed we could change the world, that we were all one and so all of our actions had repercussions in the lives of every other being on the planet.  Now, seeing so many women turned into super-consumers with zero social consciousness makes me so depressed.   I swear most women look better with a minimum of a few carefully chosen, inexpensive products which will last for years.   I've never seen that higher priced brands are better, or that this is a way to reward yourself for some other sadness in your life.  We all have sadness in our lives, and shopping doesn't address it.  I understand buying -- and showing off -- expensive brands is a status symbol, and that often this is helpful when we aren't sure how else to present ourselves.  But most of us figure this out when we are about 13. 

I worked as a model as a child and as a teenager. I'm tall and have other physical characteristics which fit the mold, but even then, when it was a relatively wholesome, honest industry compared to today, I hated the creepy men, the incessant smoking, the tons of goopy products, the fakery and the stupidity of encouraging people to buy.  I left when I had made a bit of money and finished university.  I preferred reading and being with people who used their brains, because I honestly think we're here to make the world a better place for all of us.   What is going on today that so many women choose the sheeplike, dopey path?   Why do we want so much to be 'beautiful' and 'stunning' according to the standards of Tom Ford, Charlotte Tillbury, Anna Wintour and whoever else decides the standards?    Why do we throw ourselves overboard in order to please these largely male voices? 

I'd love to do something to make the FTC laws more stringent ... perhaps make bloggers have flashing red bars on the products which they have received as samples, or where they get affiliate pay.  I'd love it if people knew where their money went when they pay $60 dollars for a foundation.  Mainly I'd love it if women would wake up and redefine beauty as something they, not the cosmetic companies, own.

Surprisingly I complained on xovain, a young women's online magazine about bloggers who flash their huge Sephora bags at the camera on their 'haul' videos, making a Sephora bag look like a cool object, at a time when 50 cities in the US now ask shoppers to bring reusable bags.   When you buy a lipstick, you can just put it in your pocket or your bag, you don't need a new bag and a bunch of tissue paper, but at Sephora and for Sephora shoppers, the bag and the extra packaging is part of the thrill! Why?  Just making grocery shoppers aware of the cost of bags to our environment has changed their habits ... would this change makeup shoppers' habits if they thought about packaging as a problem, rather than a show-off item?  I was surprised when a half dozen women answered me on xovain to say that it bothered them when women in their schools used brand-name bags to bring their lunches, because it's such an obvious cry for attention.  If young women can see this, why is Sephora and every other makeup brand still doing it?

Thanks for letting me share this.  I'd love to hear any ideas you have about this, and how to change our habits.



 

 







cara4art

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Re: Ruth Crilly (A Model Recommends) busted for hiding sponsorship
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2015, 08:32:39 AM »
Just sent you a PM - I couldn't agree more!

milla

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Re: Ruth Crilly (A Model Recommends) busted for hiding sponsorship
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2015, 09:32:13 AM »
Thank you for your post, Gilberte, it is thought provoking and puts forward some very pertinent issues-in the best TTB tradition!
 I do not read beauty blogs because I find them mostly vacuous, narcissistic and pseudo-scientific. There are lots of activities which are far more enriching and interesting than reading the musings of  Ms Smarty Pants and  I do not care if Derriere du Bébé Serum (£350 for 30ml) is far better than Decrepitude du Jour (modestly priced at £85); I am not going to spend my pension on any of them . I do look after my skin and have a skin care routine as I live in a very polluted city and I am over 60 but  I trust my friends’ recommendations or I read the views of the ladies on TTB, which are far more reliable than beauty blogs.
I am sure that most beauty bloggers aspire to what is known in my neck of the woods as ‘a nice little earner’.  Ruth Crilly got caught, but there are loads out there doing exactly the same. People read these blogs; they have flocks of followers, so they are good news to the cosmetic companies, who are eager to push their products. Exception made for some You Tube videos, I don’t spend time reading beauty blogs and I have even given up on Beautypedia, because I find some of the reviews highly contradictory.
Not all models are ignorant and empty headed, Twiggy for example, was am actress as well as a model and she continues to be a very elegant and articulate woman. There are other models, who are very intelligent and use their influence and image for very good causes. Young girls aspire to a model’s life style because see it as a modern fairy tale. The young will always fantasise and it is up to governments, parents and educators to ensure that they are not brainwashed. This is why it is so important to invest on education. You mention the Kardashians; personally I loathe reality shows.  I would not go as far as to endorse censorship, but I believe there are people who are making big bucks out serving the masses their daily ration of rubbish. Those of us who grew up in the 50s and 60s can remember a time when, to be famous, you had to do something exceptionally good…or exceptionally bad! I am not quite sure I can pinpoint the time when it was decided that everyone was entitled to 5 minutes in the limelight, but these reality shows certainly give people a distorted view of reality.
Climate change and the damage that human beings are doing to the environment is a reality, too stark to be ignored. And as for the effects of mad consumerism…the chickens are coming home to roost, here in Europe. Countries that were, at one time, if not rich, at least self-sufficient, are now facing crippling debt, and why? Because instead of building up on their resources, natural and human, they  abandoned their industries and accepted the hand-outs of richer countries. But I digress. Coming back to the beauty industry, it is up to the consumers to blow the whistle on the cosmetic companies. We can still change the world: we can begin by changing our own habits.

cara4art

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Re: Ruth Crilly (A Model Recommends) busted for hiding sponsorship
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2015, 05:22:59 PM »
@milla: I'm right there with you too, on all counts!:)

gilberte

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  • Posts: 83
Re: Ruth Crilly (A Model Recommends) busted for hiding sponsorship
« Reply #4 on: July 15, 2015, 10:50:02 AM »
Milla and Cara, thanks for your thoughtful responses.  I felt like a weird freak after I posted that, but then when I look around me, almost no one wears makeup, or maybe a tiny bit ... then when I watch beauty bloggers they have 20+ makeup items all newly purchased because the stuff they bought 4 months ago is outdated!!! for their natural look, and it is so false. 

I'm fascinated by this entire youtube beauty thing without being sure why but I continue to think about this.  A beauty video is like a short story or a fairy tale, with a clear narrative:  she starts plain, or with a 'problem' (blemish? lonely?), gathers her arsenal and at the end she is transformed!  I'm more interested in the nastier subtexts however I see how the surface story is alluring.

Yesterday a very young canadian vlogger I follow posted a video to her site which was a paid commercial by L'Oreal for a mascara starring her-- she has already been scooped up by L'Oreal to push their mascara.  I was thrilled to see that her page was flooded with hundreds of very articulate, polite and brilliant complaints by her subscribers.  A few hundred (including me) unsubscribed.   Said vlogger is 21, very pretty, and I'm sure is hoping she will be seen by more industry folks to launch a modeling career. 

I decided to do something else in my personal exploration of this issue.  I've been very sad and upset by the shootings in Charleston, and have been looking at my own racism.  I decided to subscribe to several African-American beauty bloggers, to give them thumbs up and positive comments  They are gorgeous and deserve them -- I'm not lying.  The internet world is as rascist as any other part of our society.  I see that African-American youtubers receive maybe 1/100th or 1/1000th or 1/10000th as many views and subscribers as white women.   I understand that for youtubers, it's the amount of subscribers, views, and comments that count in order to be recognized.  This is my little way to connect to new friends, to support women I want to support, and to reach out over the cold void of the internet!!   The 3 women I subscribed to have already responded to me with thanks and sweet comments, which wasn't necessary but of course I am touched.  They are talented, fun and original.       

Also found this article on the Hairpin, an online women's magazine, which I thought was quite good and funny about the youtube thing:

http://thehairpin.com/2014/06/my-imaginary-friends-the-beauty-youtuber-economy/

milla

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Re: Ruth Crilly (A Model Recommends) busted for hiding sponsorship
« Reply #5 on: July 15, 2015, 12:20:24 PM »
You are not a weird freak, you are a thinking person. I stopped buying women’s magazines because of the beauty sections: if you were silly enough to follow their advice you would be ruined (in fact, lots of people are living well above their means and getting into debt because they want to have the latest fashions and beauty products). How many products is one supposed to use every day? Cleanser, toner, serum, day cream, sunscreen… and then on top of that comes all the make-up: primer, lip primer, eye primer, foundation, concealer, powder…it is ridiculous. And then there are all the different lotions and potions and the balms and the treatments, and the anti-aging products! I use a cleanser every day. This is because I like to keep clean! I use a sunscreen if I am lucky enough to see the sun. I use the same moisturiser in the morning and at night. And I like to do my own masks and I sometimes splash out on a nice bottle of rose oil because I like facial massage; I think it helps to keep the wrinkles at bay, but I do it mainly because it relaxes me. I learned facial massage techniques in YouTube; occasionally I like watching make-up videos.
Up until recently the beauty industry ignored the existence of Black and Asian women. The stereotype of the blonde, blue-eyed beauty is still prevalent. As someone who taught girls for quite a few years, I have seen the damage to young black and Asian women’s self- esteem. I cannot tell you how much I detest the mind-set that creates such divisions.  But I am an optimist and (hopefully!) a fighter! I think things will change if we care enough about it.
« Last Edit: July 15, 2015, 12:46:07 PM by milla »

cara4art

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Re: Ruth Crilly (A Model Recommends) busted for hiding sponsorship
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2015, 09:15:33 AM »
@milla: I'm with you on the women's mags too, for the same reasons. Most of the beauty advice is off the mark in so many ways, and reflects who is advertising in the magazine rather than what actually works. My husband and I have a saying that the more one sees some personal care item or food product advertised, the more worthless it is. After all, they have to spend lots of money on marketing to get people to think they need something that they would have been better off steering clear of. In the line of skin care, I do remember some time back that a New York dermatologist was seeing her patients coming in with ALL these products that were often working at cross-purposes and peoples' skins were NOT happy!:( She put each and every one of them on a skincare "diet" meaning just cleanser, basic moisturizer according to skin type, sunblock, and maybe one active night treatment(like a retinoid or alpha-hydroxy product). Another thing that I notice about the mags is that it's all about BUYING, and more product-driven than when we were a lot younger, simply because there's so much more stuff around now. Never is there anything that could help young women in particular manage their money, other than the occasional article about beauty on a budget, but that's still BUYING stuff!
     In general, I couldn't agree more about the need for more inclusiveness as far as what's beautiful. After all, the reality of the planet is that we have all races, all ages, all sexes. Actually, that's MAC cosmetics tagline, which I think is a good one myself - that kind of marketing I can get behind. I do buy a few of their products as they work for me(foundation, blush, concealer, and one eyeliner pencil color that isn't duped at the drugstore).  The rest of my stuff is drugstore. I've always said, what with my past and current years spent in multicultural cities, when I see various colors of people around me on the bus "Now that's REAL beauty!"
About the YouTube people, it would be great to see some of mature women who are not in the blond, lily-white/pink-toned category. Even though I'm Caucasian with a light-medium depth of skintone, I have enough yellow and slight olive in my skin that actually some of the stuff for the lightest-toned non-Caucasian women is more spot-on for me. I've even had makeup artists comment that I'm not as light as I look because they're thrown off by the contrast between my hair and skin, and they tend to swatch me a little too light and too beige when it comes to foundation. So I do look at some YouTubes of golden and brown-skinned ladies!:)
Last but not least, I find it appalling as well when I see that some young MUAer has bought multiple shades of a new lipstick or eyeshadow line that she can't stop burbling about. Out of a given line for instance, how can more than a very few shades in those actually work on one's coloring? Again, I like makeup and skincare, but I do NOT need 9000 of each thing LOL! And as far as one's makeup stash being outdated, that's only true if one didn't buy the few things that work for one in the first place, or the makeup really is too old(usually not the case - much makeup lasts a lot longer than a lot of people think, save for mascara). This is why I have to laugh when some beauty people solemnly say that one should replace one's eye shadows after only 3 months. That sounds like a rather obvious pitch to just keep buying more stuff.

milla

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Re: Ruth Crilly (A Model Recommends) busted for hiding sponsorship
« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2015, 08:07:56 AM »

I like the idea of a skin care diet! I was talking to a pharmacist a while ago about the number of products some people use on a daily basis. According to her, this causes more harm than good. But I don’t want to sound too virtuous! I would be a hypocrite if I did not admit that I was, once, a lipstick hoarder! However, common sense prevailed: I looked at my stash and I realised that I was only using one or two lipsticks on a regular basis and they were more or less the same colour. I decided that it was high time to stop buying lipstick and now I have a couple and it is fine. I find that having too much stuff makes life complicated, but that is me.
London is one of the most ethnically diverse cities in the world. Despite being polluted and frantic, it is just amazing living here. When you go into town you see people from all over the world. When I worked as a teacher, I used to love school concerts and leavers’ day, because some of the girls came in their saris or in African dress.  I love the henna patterns that Asian women wear on their hands and feet on special occasions and the effect of a bright lipstick on a black woman.