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Author Topic: Sunscreen  (Read 2716 times)

milla

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  • Posts: 3031
Sunscreen
« on: May 19, 2016, 01:52:12 AM »
It is that time of year again…the sun comes out every now and then, we even had a few days when the temperatures went up to 24˚C /75 F, so we start thinking ‘sunscreen’… I do not use sunscreen during the winter; I know what they say, but I am Vitamin D deficient (like a lot of people in the UK). However, when it is sunny and hot, you need it. Last year I bought Clarins Sun Wrinkle control cream factor 50. It smells lovely but like most sunscreens it is quite thick and does not absorb very well; It also stings if it gets in your eyes. I found I could not apply moisturiser on top as it was so rich. Any recs for a light, but effective, sunscreen?

anne

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2016, 02:31:48 AM »
I don' t think it is available in Britain ( it is not in Finland....) but  Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Dry-Touch sunscreen is what I've been looking for for decades. It absorbs very well, does not show, and lasts and lasts!I had not realized you could, or would, apply moisturizer on top of any sunscreen?
  • Complexion: NC 15 winter, NC 20 summer. Still oily.
  • Eyes: Blue
  • Hair: *Very* fine + wavy. Middle / dark blonde (my natural hair color) with some highlights.

Styyna

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  • "steena"
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2016, 07:09:22 AM »
I subscribe to Consumer Reports here in the US and they recently released their test results for sunscreens. I was just looking at them and it appears they might have free access to their site for a very limited time so I'm sharing the URL to their ratings with no guarantee that it will work:

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/health/beauty-personal-care/sunscreens/sunscreen-ratings/ratings-overview.htm

If the link doesn't work, look at the top of the page for a paragraph about their efforts to improve and free access and, if that paragraph is there, click on the link to see if that gives free access.

I have to rush out to an appointment but will check back later and try to verify the link for myself.
  • Complexion: NW10; slight rosacea; dry
  • Eyes: Blue-gray
  • Hair: Dark blonde with slight gray, thick, wavy, dry
To be kind to all, to like many and love a few, to be needed and wanted by those we love, is certainly the nearest we can come to happiness. - Mary Stuart

cara4art

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  • Posts: 2174
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2016, 09:54:16 AM »
     That link did work!:) Pretty comprehensive list, although Consumer Reports is not always right on when it comes to anything applied to the skin. After all, some years ago, they thought that Vaseline Intensive Care lotion was the BEST body lotion. Oh no it isn't - the smell is just awful, plus the FEEL of it was dreadful too. Yet my dad loved it, so go figure.
     Anyhow, facial sunblock in particular is really challenging to find one that works on one's skin, for any number of reasons, ESPECIALLY if one has any kind of reactive skin. Either many simply don't absorb like milla mentions with the one she had, or they're too greasy, too drying, too irritating, too whitening, and/or don't play nice with makeup. So it's really an individual thing. As far which comes first in application, sunblock or moisturizer, most dermatologists agree that moisturizer comes first, THEN the sunblock. Although there is one dermatologist out there who says vice-versa who has a bunch of YouTube videos. However, once one finds one that one likes, stick with it year-round, no matter what the weather. Yes, I know about the D(be sure you take the D3, the effective form of the Vitamin), and that unprotected sun exposure is supposedly the best way to get it. That might well be, but the sun year-round(even in cloudier more northern locations) is a lot stronger than it was 50 years ago. So in this case, take that D year round and wear the sunblock and consider it to be part of one's daily skin care. Vitamin D3 drops are an economical way of taking D3, as many people, even in more southern latitudes are surprisingly deficient. One can take a good bit more than is commonly recommended too. Other D3 benefits include immune-boosting to respiratory infections, and it's also necessary for absorption of supplemental calcium and magnesium - important for us mature women.
     For myself, I just wear the sunblock(CeraVe AM SPF 30) on face, and don't bother with hands(as I'm always washing them)or the rest of my body since I live in a cool-temperate climate and thus covered up. Hope any of this helps!:)

milla

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  • Posts: 3031
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2016, 11:49:45 AM »
Anne, I have also read about Neutrogena suncare, but we cannot get it here. There  an whole lot of Neutrogena products that are not available in the UK. Cara, Thanks for the link, it is interesting that La Roche Posay is so highly rated. I have bought it in the past, it is good (all La Roche Posay line is very good)  but it is still a bit greasy. I think that on really hot days I am just going to skip make up and moisturiser and apply only sunscreen….  Hopefully I will  be able to do some work in the garden soon (the weeds are laughing at me, I can hear them!) and I will definitely need sunscreen.
I am taking Vitamin D and calcium now, on prescription. I will have to take it for the rest of my life but in the UK over 60s don’t pay for prescriptions. If you have/have had cancer prescriptions are free not matter how old you are.


Styyna

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  • "steena"
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2016, 02:44:35 PM »
I'm so glad the link worked!

I agree, Cara, that Consumer Reports doesn't always hit the nail on the head but the biggest takeaway for me with regard to sunscreens has to do with their efficacy (or lack of it). CR tested SPF and discovered that many sunscreens don't last nearly as long as they claim. I've pretty much given up on finding a sunscreen that doesn't leave a lingering scent and/or odd feel behind so I was interested in finding the most effective SPF.

After reading the ratings, I have to wonder about the SPF claims of cosmetics. For example, does my new tinted moisturizer have an SPF of 20? Or is it really only half that? I guess the only way to be safe is to ignore the cosmetic claims and always apply a sunscreen.
  • Complexion: NW10; slight rosacea; dry
  • Eyes: Blue-gray
  • Hair: Dark blonde with slight gray, thick, wavy, dry
To be kind to all, to like many and love a few, to be needed and wanted by those we love, is certainly the nearest we can come to happiness. - Mary Stuart

cara4art

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2016, 03:35:01 PM »
@Stynna: I wouldn't rely on ANY makeup having sufficient SPF for protection. Still, better than nothing whatsoever, if one really can't tolerate any sunblocks at all. Which there are any number of people with extremely reactive skins who simply cannot, or one gets fed up with the still-lousy texture, etc. of many facial sunblocks. There's a lot of room for improvement, especially in the lower to mid-end products. Sure, if one is willing to spend more than $40 for a tiny 1.7oz. bottle that will last maybe a month at most, sure there are some more cosmetically-elegant facial sunblock products. Also, it seems that many dermatologists recommend effective sunblocks, but they assume one is not wearing makeup. Which most of us are to some degree or another, and we know that a lot of these straight-up sunblocks don't play nice with it.
Ideally, one should have a straight-up sunblock in addition to one's moisturizer, but that's not always feasible for everyone due to the above. I'm in between, with using the CeraVe SPF30 moisturizer, on top of Cetaphil Cream(I need those 2 layers for hydration, etc. even though I don't have a super-dry skin type). What counts is what works for one and that one will do consistently.:)

anne

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2016, 01:58:23 AM »
Milla, Neutrogena sunscreens are available on E**y. As I live at the end of the world (ok, not quite!), I often have to shop there.
  • Complexion: NC 15 winter, NC 20 summer. Still oily.
  • Eyes: Blue
  • Hair: *Very* fine + wavy. Middle / dark blonde (my natural hair color) with some highlights.

SusanG

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2016, 11:22:32 AM »
Not to make you feel worse, Milla,    :-\   but should you luck out and find Neutrogena sunscreen, I highly recommend the UltraSheer Water-Light Daily Face Sunscreen, SPF 60. It's a watery consistency that absorbs into the skin right away. You honestly can't feel it! For the rest of me, I use Neutrogena (sorry) UltraSheer Dry-Touch Sunscreen, SPF 45. It's thicker, but does absorb completely.
  • Complexion: Fair: MAC NC15, Ivory in Dior
  • Eyes: Blue
  • Hair: Natural light brown with a little silver, pixie cut

milla

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  • Posts: 3031
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2016, 04:32:27 AM »
I am going to look for it in Amazon, thanks for the rec.

Angelcat47

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  • Posts: 242
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2016, 06:23:58 PM »
I recently started using Biore UV Aqua Rich Watery Gel SPF 50. I hated sunscreens...until this one. Absolutely weightless feeling on the skin, absorbs nicely and no greasy feel. I think it's a one ounce bottle(everything but the name is in Japanese) and I paid $10. I bought it on Amazon.
  • Complexion: Light skintone,oily and somewhat sensitive
  • Eyes: Brown
  • Hair: Medium brown with blonde highlights

milla

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  • Posts: 3031
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2016, 02:45:58 AM »
I bought Neutrogena Ultra Sheer SPF 100 Dry-Touch Lotion from Amazon. Could not find the Water -Light SPF 60 and this one had lots of good reviews. I have just tried it on my wrist and it absorbed very well, no reaction. The smell is not as nice as the Clarins...but it is not offensive. Cost about $15 for 90ml which is not bad in comparison with other brands.

milla

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  • Posts: 3031
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2016, 12:54:54 PM »
I have tried the Neutrogena sunscreen on my face today and I really liked it. And then… guess what? I read an article about the best and worst sunscreens and Neutrogena is listed as one of the baddies, full of nassssty chemicals and what –not. Oh well… I guess DH and I will just have to wear burkas on holiday. But they will have to be 100% organic cotton, undyed and preferably hand-stitched  by  vegan monks  in a remote  monastery in the mountains of Tibet… Sorry. As DH would say, sarcasm is the lowest form of wit  :rollseyes:

Styyna

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  • Posts: 3717
  • "steena"
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2016, 08:12:59 AM »
Are the chemicals supposed to be bad for health overall as a result of applying them topically? Or are they supposed to cause bad skin reactions only? I truly don't know but it seems if it's the latter and one's skin doesn't react negatively then I wouldn't worry too much.
  • Complexion: NW10; slight rosacea; dry
  • Eyes: Blue-gray
  • Hair: Dark blonde with slight gray, thick, wavy, dry
To be kind to all, to like many and love a few, to be needed and wanted by those we love, is certainly the nearest we can come to happiness. - Mary Stuart

cara4art

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  • Posts: 2174
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2016, 09:38:54 AM »
Certain groups can be REALLY alarmist about chemicals in skin care products including sunblocks. The Environmental Working Group comes to mind, along with sellers of natural skin care products who basically say that all regular skin care and even makeup is bad. If they were really that bad as they say they are, then everyone would be dropping like flies. I'd worry MORE about the quality of the food one eats as well as what's in one's water and air rather than a skin cream. That said, if something doesn't agree with one's skin, then by all means don't use it. I sure found that out along the way with having selectively reactive skin(fine with some stuff, throwing fits at other stuff). Meanwhile, all the alarmist groups are putting stuff out there on the Internet like you should throw out all your skin care products including sunblock and makeup, just use coconut oil, as well as just use baking soda and vinegar to cleanse one's hair. Sure, great, if it works for one but a whole lot of the time it doesn't. Don't get me wrong, there are any number of natural ingredients that are great, but one's mileage may vary.:)
But back to sunblocks, they're really only meant for emergency use, as in, no other way to protect oneself if one has to be out for any length of time. This is why I only apply to face, since faces are exposed all the time while the rest of the body usually isn't. Even in very hot countries, people do cover up because sun on large areas of skin actually make one hotter. Long loose layers are better. Sunblocks have often given people a false sense of security in that the folks think they can just apply sunblock once or twice during the day and stay out all day. Far better is to use sunblock along with other common sense measures, like not being out in the middle of the day if one doesn't have to be, wearing hats and clothing to cover up, or just staying in the shade. People did all of these before there were sunblocks.