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Author Topic: Sunscreen  (Read 2270 times)

milla

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Sunscreen
« on: May 19, 2016, 01:52:12 AM »
It is that time of year again…the sun comes out every now and then, we even had a few days when the temperatures went up to 24˚C /75 F, so we start thinking ‘sunscreen’… I do not use sunscreen during the winter; I know what they say, but I am Vitamin D deficient (like a lot of people in the UK). However, when it is sunny and hot, you need it. Last year I bought Clarins Sun Wrinkle control cream factor 50. It smells lovely but like most sunscreens it is quite thick and does not absorb very well; It also stings if it gets in your eyes. I found I could not apply moisturiser on top as it was so rich. Any recs for a light, but effective, sunscreen?

anne

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #1 on: May 19, 2016, 02:31:48 AM »
I don' t think it is available in Britain ( it is not in Finland....) but  Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Dry-Touch sunscreen is what I've been looking for for decades. It absorbs very well, does not show, and lasts and lasts!I had not realized you could, or would, apply moisturizer on top of any sunscreen?
  • Complexion: NC 15 winter, NC 20 summer. Still oily.
  • Eyes: Blue
  • Hair: *Very* fine + wavy. Middle / dark blonde (my natural hair color) with some highlights.

Styyna

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  • "steena"
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #2 on: May 19, 2016, 07:09:22 AM »
I subscribe to Consumer Reports here in the US and they recently released their test results for sunscreens. I was just looking at them and it appears they might have free access to their site for a very limited time so I'm sharing the URL to their ratings with no guarantee that it will work:

http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/health/beauty-personal-care/sunscreens/sunscreen-ratings/ratings-overview.htm

If the link doesn't work, look at the top of the page for a paragraph about their efforts to improve and free access and, if that paragraph is there, click on the link to see if that gives free access.

I have to rush out to an appointment but will check back later and try to verify the link for myself.
  • Complexion: NW10; slight rosacea; dry
  • Eyes: Blue-gray
  • Hair: Dark blonde with slight gray, thick, wavy, dry
To be kind to all, to like many and love a few, to be needed and wanted by those we love, is certainly the nearest we can come to happiness. - Mary Stuart

cara4art

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #3 on: May 19, 2016, 09:54:16 AM »
     That link did work!:) Pretty comprehensive list, although Consumer Reports is not always right on when it comes to anything applied to the skin. After all, some years ago, they thought that Vaseline Intensive Care lotion was the BEST body lotion. Oh no it isn't - the smell is just awful, plus the FEEL of it was dreadful too. Yet my dad loved it, so go figure.
     Anyhow, facial sunblock in particular is really challenging to find one that works on one's skin, for any number of reasons, ESPECIALLY if one has any kind of reactive skin. Either many simply don't absorb like milla mentions with the one she had, or they're too greasy, too drying, too irritating, too whitening, and/or don't play nice with makeup. So it's really an individual thing. As far which comes first in application, sunblock or moisturizer, most dermatologists agree that moisturizer comes first, THEN the sunblock. Although there is one dermatologist out there who says vice-versa who has a bunch of YouTube videos. However, once one finds one that one likes, stick with it year-round, no matter what the weather. Yes, I know about the D(be sure you take the D3, the effective form of the Vitamin), and that unprotected sun exposure is supposedly the best way to get it. That might well be, but the sun year-round(even in cloudier more northern locations) is a lot stronger than it was 50 years ago. So in this case, take that D year round and wear the sunblock and consider it to be part of one's daily skin care. Vitamin D3 drops are an economical way of taking D3, as many people, even in more southern latitudes are surprisingly deficient. One can take a good bit more than is commonly recommended too. Other D3 benefits include immune-boosting to respiratory infections, and it's also necessary for absorption of supplemental calcium and magnesium - important for us mature women.
     For myself, I just wear the sunblock(CeraVe AM SPF 30) on face, and don't bother with hands(as I'm always washing them)or the rest of my body since I live in a cool-temperate climate and thus covered up. Hope any of this helps!:)

milla

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2016, 11:49:45 AM »
Anne, I have also read about Neutrogena suncare, but we cannot get it here. There  an whole lot of Neutrogena products that are not available in the UK. Cara, Thanks for the link, it is interesting that La Roche Posay is so highly rated. I have bought it in the past, it is good (all La Roche Posay line is very good)  but it is still a bit greasy. I think that on really hot days I am just going to skip make up and moisturiser and apply only sunscreen….  Hopefully I will  be able to do some work in the garden soon (the weeds are laughing at me, I can hear them!) and I will definitely need sunscreen.
I am taking Vitamin D and calcium now, on prescription. I will have to take it for the rest of my life but in the UK over 60s don’t pay for prescriptions. If you have/have had cancer prescriptions are free not matter how old you are.


Styyna

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  • "steena"
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #5 on: May 19, 2016, 02:44:35 PM »
I'm so glad the link worked!

I agree, Cara, that Consumer Reports doesn't always hit the nail on the head but the biggest takeaway for me with regard to sunscreens has to do with their efficacy (or lack of it). CR tested SPF and discovered that many sunscreens don't last nearly as long as they claim. I've pretty much given up on finding a sunscreen that doesn't leave a lingering scent and/or odd feel behind so I was interested in finding the most effective SPF.

After reading the ratings, I have to wonder about the SPF claims of cosmetics. For example, does my new tinted moisturizer have an SPF of 20? Or is it really only half that? I guess the only way to be safe is to ignore the cosmetic claims and always apply a sunscreen.
  • Complexion: NW10; slight rosacea; dry
  • Eyes: Blue-gray
  • Hair: Dark blonde with slight gray, thick, wavy, dry
To be kind to all, to like many and love a few, to be needed and wanted by those we love, is certainly the nearest we can come to happiness. - Mary Stuart

cara4art

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #6 on: May 19, 2016, 03:35:01 PM »
@Stynna: I wouldn't rely on ANY makeup having sufficient SPF for protection. Still, better than nothing whatsoever, if one really can't tolerate any sunblocks at all. Which there are any number of people with extremely reactive skins who simply cannot, or one gets fed up with the still-lousy texture, etc. of many facial sunblocks. There's a lot of room for improvement, especially in the lower to mid-end products. Sure, if one is willing to spend more than $40 for a tiny 1.7oz. bottle that will last maybe a month at most, sure there are some more cosmetically-elegant facial sunblock products. Also, it seems that many dermatologists recommend effective sunblocks, but they assume one is not wearing makeup. Which most of us are to some degree or another, and we know that a lot of these straight-up sunblocks don't play nice with it.
Ideally, one should have a straight-up sunblock in addition to one's moisturizer, but that's not always feasible for everyone due to the above. I'm in between, with using the CeraVe SPF30 moisturizer, on top of Cetaphil Cream(I need those 2 layers for hydration, etc. even though I don't have a super-dry skin type). What counts is what works for one and that one will do consistently.:)

anne

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #7 on: May 20, 2016, 01:58:23 AM »
Milla, Neutrogena sunscreens are available on E**y. As I live at the end of the world (ok, not quite!), I often have to shop there.
  • Complexion: NC 15 winter, NC 20 summer. Still oily.
  • Eyes: Blue
  • Hair: *Very* fine + wavy. Middle / dark blonde (my natural hair color) with some highlights.

SusanG

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #8 on: May 20, 2016, 11:22:32 AM »
Not to make you feel worse, Milla,    :-\   but should you luck out and find Neutrogena sunscreen, I highly recommend the UltraSheer Water-Light Daily Face Sunscreen, SPF 60. It's a watery consistency that absorbs into the skin right away. You honestly can't feel it! For the rest of me, I use Neutrogena (sorry) UltraSheer Dry-Touch Sunscreen, SPF 45. It's thicker, but does absorb completely.
  • Complexion: Fair: MAC NC15, Ivory in Dior
  • Eyes: Blue
  • Hair: Natural light brown with a little silver, pixie cut

milla

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2016, 04:32:27 AM »
I am going to look for it in Amazon, thanks for the rec.

Angelcat47

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2016, 06:23:58 PM »
I recently started using Biore UV Aqua Rich Watery Gel SPF 50. I hated sunscreens...until this one. Absolutely weightless feeling on the skin, absorbs nicely and no greasy feel. I think it's a one ounce bottle(everything but the name is in Japanese) and I paid $10. I bought it on Amazon.
  • Complexion: Light skintone,oily and somewhat sensitive
  • Eyes: Brown
  • Hair: Medium brown with blonde highlights

milla

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #11 on: May 26, 2016, 02:45:58 AM »
I bought Neutrogena Ultra Sheer SPF 100 Dry-Touch Lotion from Amazon. Could not find the Water -Light SPF 60 and this one had lots of good reviews. I have just tried it on my wrist and it absorbed very well, no reaction. The smell is not as nice as the Clarins...but it is not offensive. Cost about $15 for 90ml which is not bad in comparison with other brands.

milla

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #12 on: May 26, 2016, 12:54:54 PM »
I have tried the Neutrogena sunscreen on my face today and I really liked it. And then… guess what? I read an article about the best and worst sunscreens and Neutrogena is listed as one of the baddies, full of nassssty chemicals and what –not. Oh well… I guess DH and I will just have to wear burkas on holiday. But they will have to be 100% organic cotton, undyed and preferably hand-stitched  by  vegan monks  in a remote  monastery in the mountains of Tibet… Sorry. As DH would say, sarcasm is the lowest form of wit  :rollseyes:

Styyna

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  • "steena"
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #13 on: May 28, 2016, 08:12:59 AM »
Are the chemicals supposed to be bad for health overall as a result of applying them topically? Or are they supposed to cause bad skin reactions only? I truly don't know but it seems if it's the latter and one's skin doesn't react negatively then I wouldn't worry too much.
  • Complexion: NW10; slight rosacea; dry
  • Eyes: Blue-gray
  • Hair: Dark blonde with slight gray, thick, wavy, dry
To be kind to all, to like many and love a few, to be needed and wanted by those we love, is certainly the nearest we can come to happiness. - Mary Stuart

cara4art

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #14 on: May 28, 2016, 09:38:54 AM »
Certain groups can be REALLY alarmist about chemicals in skin care products including sunblocks. The Environmental Working Group comes to mind, along with sellers of natural skin care products who basically say that all regular skin care and even makeup is bad. If they were really that bad as they say they are, then everyone would be dropping like flies. I'd worry MORE about the quality of the food one eats as well as what's in one's water and air rather than a skin cream. That said, if something doesn't agree with one's skin, then by all means don't use it. I sure found that out along the way with having selectively reactive skin(fine with some stuff, throwing fits at other stuff). Meanwhile, all the alarmist groups are putting stuff out there on the Internet like you should throw out all your skin care products including sunblock and makeup, just use coconut oil, as well as just use baking soda and vinegar to cleanse one's hair. Sure, great, if it works for one but a whole lot of the time it doesn't. Don't get me wrong, there are any number of natural ingredients that are great, but one's mileage may vary.:)
But back to sunblocks, they're really only meant for emergency use, as in, no other way to protect oneself if one has to be out for any length of time. This is why I only apply to face, since faces are exposed all the time while the rest of the body usually isn't. Even in very hot countries, people do cover up because sun on large areas of skin actually make one hotter. Long loose layers are better. Sunblocks have often given people a false sense of security in that the folks think they can just apply sunblock once or twice during the day and stay out all day. Far better is to use sunblock along with other common sense measures, like not being out in the middle of the day if one doesn't have to be, wearing hats and clothing to cover up, or just staying in the shade. People did all of these before there were sunblocks.

milla

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #15 on: May 28, 2016, 01:13:39 PM »
Yes…I remember accompanying my late mother to the dermatologist (she had treatment for a benign skin cancer) and he told us more or less the same. He also said that in the past, all ladies would wear hats as a matter of precaution (not just as a fashion statement). That afternoon, I took my mother to a hat shop and she reluctantly accepted my gift of a very nice hat; she was afraid that people might think that she was just ‘showing off’! she was very fair-skinned, unlike me.

Styyna

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  • "steena"
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #16 on: May 31, 2016, 05:20:44 PM »
I, too, try to avoid excessive sun by covering up and avoiding the peak sunlight hours. Besides my face and neck, I apply sunscreen to the backs of my hands since they seem to get the most sun exposure no matter what I do.

I wish I looked good in hats and didn't find them so bothersome. That's one way of staying out of the sun that I don't yet employ. It seems that every time I put one on and go out the wind comes up out of nowhere and I have to hold onto it.
  • Complexion: NW10; slight rosacea; dry
  • Eyes: Blue-gray
  • Hair: Dark blonde with slight gray, thick, wavy, dry
To be kind to all, to like many and love a few, to be needed and wanted by those we love, is certainly the nearest we can come to happiness. - Mary Stuart

Angelcat47

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #17 on: May 31, 2016, 07:51:51 PM »
Don't feel bad,Styyna. Every time I've tried a hat,one or the other of my DS has told me I look ridiculous in one. :lol:
  • Complexion: Light skintone,oily and somewhat sensitive
  • Eyes: Brown
  • Hair: Medium brown with blonde highlights

Styyna

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  • "steena"
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #18 on: May 31, 2016, 09:08:48 PM »
Ah, yes. The joys of sons, right? Always so helpful with their comments, aren't they? :D
  • Complexion: NW10; slight rosacea; dry
  • Eyes: Blue-gray
  • Hair: Dark blonde with slight gray, thick, wavy, dry
To be kind to all, to like many and love a few, to be needed and wanted by those we love, is certainly the nearest we can come to happiness. - Mary Stuart

Swest

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2016, 09:37:51 AM »
I bought my first serious hat for a concert I was to attend a month ago, but only wore it a few times when I was walking around for an hour walking a neighbors dog. Still got some sun. I do not see myself wearing it much in public, but save for either special occasions but otherwise searching for the perfect casual cap /visor thing to wear everyday. Not easy when you are larger than the average woman and everything is made for smaller heads.

As for sunscreen have started slowly looking at Japanese brands or version of US brands for the body. Did buy a small bottle of Shishedo (?) sunscreen spf 50 but its not waterproof so no good if I go swimming and get my head wet. I did wear an old straw hat that was my moms (she wore hats occasionally in her later years) in the pool to shield myself and my eyes along with oversized sunglasses. Im not super fair -more medium skin) but do have a lot of moles and freckles on my body from past sunburns and hereditary, mostly on my mothers side. I remember she did have a small spot that had to be removed on her nose, so I am conscious I could get it later if not sooner. I live in a very sunny climate and have considered getting those arm gloves that you use for driving (if I can find any that fit me) or thin driving gloves. It would be a pain but looking at my hands lately Ive gotten quite a bit of sun damage so it is a concern. 
  • Complexion: Fair-med NC20, combo
  • Eyes: Brown
  • Hair: Dark Reddish Brown

milla

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #20 on: June 01, 2016, 12:13:28 PM »
Swest, my mother’s benign carcinoma (it is called a ‘rodent ulcer’, not very nice…) was near her nose; it is quite common in older people and it can be treated relatively easily, with a very simple procedure that does not leave much of a scar. I have not got moles in my body or sun spots on my hands, but I do have a couple of sun spots on my face, despite having olive skin, which tans easily. My daughter, who inherited DH’s Celtic colouring, has quite a few moles on her back and I worry about her. When she was a teenager she used to sunbathe on holidays; she could not accept that it was not good for her skin. She knows better now. Imo, anyone with fair skin needs to be extremely careful in the sun; you cannot take any chances. I always wear a hat in the garden when it is sunny and I pack a couple whenever I go abroad  on holidays.

denisiel

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #21 on: June 08, 2016, 03:17:52 AM »
As for sunscreen have started slowly looking at Japanese brands or version of US brands for the body. Did buy a small bottle of Shishedo (?) sunscreen spf 50 but its not waterproof so no good if I go swimming and get my head wet. I did wear an old straw hat that was my moms (she wore hats occasionally in her later years) in the pool to shield myself and my eyes along with oversized sunglasses. Im not super fair -more medium skin) but do have a lot of moles and freckles on my body from past sunburns and hereditary, mostly on my mothers side. I remember she did have a small spot that had to be removed on her nose, so I am conscious I could get it later if not sooner. I live in a very sunny climate and have considered getting those arm gloves that you use for driving (if I can find any that fit me) or thin driving gloves. It would be a pain but looking at my hands lately Ive gotten quite a bit of sun damage so it is a concern.

Maybe you should look into Shiseido Wet Force or Anessa Perfect UV Sunscreen Aqua Booster as they feature new technology that causes the sunscreen to bind with skin upon contact with water or sweat and offer the highest UVA and UVB protection of SPF 50+ and PA++++.

silverstreak

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2016, 08:28:01 AM »
I don' t think it is available in Britain ( it is not in Finland....) but  Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Dry-Touch sunscreen is what I've been looking for for decades. It absorbs very well, does not show, and lasts and lasts!I had not realized you could, or would, apply moisturizer on top of any sunscreen?

If you are still looking for it Anne I think it is available on amazon.co.uk £8.99 + postage.
  • Complexion: olive
  • Eyes: brown
  • Hair: white & grey, straight but coarse & thick.
silverstreak

cara4art

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2016, 08:57:26 AM »
@anne: moisturizer goes UNDER sunscreen, not on top. Most dermatologists pretty much agree on this, save for one who has YouTube videos saying exactly the opposite. His theory is that sunscreen should be applied to BARE skin so the sunscreen chemicals can better protect the skin. However, almost no other dermatologist agrees with him though.

milla

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #24 on: June 23, 2016, 02:32:21 AM »
Hi Ladies, I have been away for 10 nights; we went to Southern Portugal, where it is sunny and fairly hot. Used the Neutrogena sunscreen everyday and was very pleased with it. I actually skipped the moisturiser during the day and only applied make-up (i.e.foundation and blusher) in the evening when we went out to dinner. Having seen the sun damage on the faces some sun worshippers in my extended family, I thanked the British climate! Well, it is all very relative, is it not; they have the sun spots, I have vitamin D deficiency. You cannot win.

Jennn

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #25 on: June 24, 2016, 01:24:11 AM »
Hey ladies  8)
I`m going on a vacation next week and i wanna know how to get some tan whithout damage my skin?I tried а tanning oil, but always get sunburs.  I can`t find tanning oil with bigger spf than 40.  Any recommendations?  :rollseyes:

milla

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #26 on: June 24, 2016, 01:43:42 AM »
I am not sure there is such a thing..I have light  olive skin and used to tan  very easily, but I am done with sunbathing. However, if you want to get that 'healthy glow' (quoting the adverts...) I would suggest that you use a good product that is suitable for your skin, re-apply it  often and sunbathe in the morning up to 11:30am. Do not forget neck and hands and  use an after sun cream to moisturise your skin after sunbathing. As for sun protection, Neutrogena and Anthelios are very good and offer a wide range of products.

Jennn

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #27 on: June 27, 2016, 03:50:41 AM »
Thank`s :) I guess it`s better  'healthy glow'  and no sunburns, than dark tan and painful sunburns  :grin:

anne

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #28 on: June 27, 2016, 04:06:51 PM »
As far as I understand there´s no such thing as a "healthy glow", even, except if you use self-tan. But, yes, burning is the worst, the big baddie.

Still very very pleased with my Neutrogena Dry-Touch sunscreen, this is the sunscreen I´ve been looking for for the whole of my life! I just ordered one in SPF50+ from E**y (not sure if I am allowed to mention it here?) to use on my decollete area.

I spend some time outside daily now, as I live in Finland + the winter is SO long over here. I enjoy the light! With very good sunscreen I am able to spend 2 - 3 hours outside in my garden. Ok, back yard, then. :D
  • Complexion: NC 15 winter, NC 20 summer. Still oily.
  • Eyes: Blue
  • Hair: *Very* fine + wavy. Middle / dark blonde (my natural hair color) with some highlights.

Jennn

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #29 on: June 30, 2016, 02:58:46 AM »
I came across a very interesting article about sunscreens and what spf means.

https://sulanyc.com/blogs/news/118608772-what-does-sunscreen-factor-mean
Until know i never thought about that.  8)

silverstreak

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #30 on: July 01, 2016, 09:46:38 AM »
I don' t think it is available in Britain ( it is not in Finland....) but  Neutrogena Ultra Sheer Dry-Touch sunscreen is what I've been looking for for decades. It absorbs very well, does not show, and lasts and lasts!I had not realized you could, or would, apply moisturizer on top of any sunscreen?

You can find on YesStyle.co.uk, eBay.co.uk, iHerb.com & herbalukstore.co.uk
  • Complexion: olive
  • Eyes: brown
  • Hair: white & grey, straight but coarse & thick.
silverstreak

anne

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #31 on: July 05, 2016, 10:40:50 AM »
Silverstreak THANK YOU! I´ve never realized Neutrogena is available at iHerb, and I am a customer!  :lol:
  • Complexion: NC 15 winter, NC 20 summer. Still oily.
  • Eyes: Blue
  • Hair: *Very* fine + wavy. Middle / dark blonde (my natural hair color) with some highlights.

Swest

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Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #32 on: July 11, 2016, 09:33:57 AM »
Thank you I will look for it online

Now that I think of it, it was on her chin area and the doc just sort of scraped it off and it left a barely noticeable scar. Still.

Today was looking at my sister and her friend. Even with SPF sunscreen she got quite dark. She went river rafting for a few hours and came back almost two shades deeper. She also uses a self tanner. Frankly I don't get the whole obsession with tanning now that Im older. I'm certainly not super white, but I do not want anymore moles and freckles.
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Maybe you should look into Shiseido Wet Force or Anessa Perfect UV Sunscreen Aqua Booster as they feature new technology that causes the sunscreen to bind with skin upon contact with water or sweat and offer the highest UVA and UVB protection of SPF 50+ and PA++++.
[/quote]
  • Complexion: Fair-med NC20, combo
  • Eyes: Brown
  • Hair: Dark Reddish Brown

cara4art

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  • Posts: 2146
Re: Sunscreen
« Reply #33 on: July 11, 2016, 10:04:11 AM »
To boost sunblock protection, find a Vitamin C serum that one's skin likes. It also helps brighten the skin over time. Timeless Skincare makes a couple - one being their Hyularonic Serum with 5% Vitamin C(I started with that and it's great), and their C + E and Ferulic Acid one(20% Vitamin C) and Vitacost has their house brand, CSI Youth Serum(12% Vitamin C) Right now I'm working in the CSI one while finishing the Timeless milder one, before advancing to Timeless full-strength(20% C)that gets great reviews even by people who have finicky skin. Anyhow, using a C serum during the day under moisturizer and sunblock really does help with boosting the sun protection as well as the other benefits it has.
@Swest - I'm with you on the not being super-white(I'm light-medium that used to tan at the drop of a hat what with my yellow undertones)and also not wanting a single new sun spot or freckles. As we get older, if we tan, we tend to get blotches and spots rather than that nice even tan. Getting too tan as we get older makes us look older in addition to the skin damage it's creating. I don't use sunless tanner - they smell really bad on me such that I couldn't stand it whatsoever. Also, if one has ANY spots or freckles, self-tanner doesn't blend them in, it makes them darker. Not the look one is going for!:(